(Source: parrotlady)

rhamphotheca:

GOOD NEWS:
New population of Critically Endangered parakeets found in Brazil
Researchers supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme have uncovered a small population of grey-breasted parakeets nesting on a mountain in north-east Brazil.
by Sarah Rakowski
A team of scientists searching for remnant populations of the Critically Endangered grey-breasted parakeet has found a small group nesting in a small crevice on the top of a rugged mountain ridge in north-east Brazil.
Only around 300 of these birds are thought to remain in the wild, all of which are found in the Brazilian state of Ceará.
As part of a national action plan for the species, researchers from local organisation Aquasis have searched more than 20 sites for signs of the parakeet, focusing their efforts on areas identified as having high habitat potential or historical sightings.
This new discovery brings the total number of known groups up to three. By comparison, historical data show that at least 15 separate populations once existed…
(read more: Fauna & Flora International)
photos by Fabio Nunes and Aquasis
rhamphotheca:

GOOD NEWS:
New population of Critically Endangered parakeets found in Brazil
Researchers supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme have uncovered a small population of grey-breasted parakeets nesting on a mountain in north-east Brazil.
by Sarah Rakowski
A team of scientists searching for remnant populations of the Critically Endangered grey-breasted parakeet has found a small group nesting in a small crevice on the top of a rugged mountain ridge in north-east Brazil.
Only around 300 of these birds are thought to remain in the wild, all of which are found in the Brazilian state of Ceará.
As part of a national action plan for the species, researchers from local organisation Aquasis have searched more than 20 sites for signs of the parakeet, focusing their efforts on areas identified as having high habitat potential or historical sightings.
This new discovery brings the total number of known groups up to three. By comparison, historical data show that at least 15 separate populations once existed…
(read more: Fauna & Flora International)
photos by Fabio Nunes and Aquasis

rhamphotheca:

GOOD NEWS:

New population of Critically Endangered parakeets found in Brazil

Researchers supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme have uncovered a small population of grey-breasted parakeets nesting on a mountain in north-east Brazil.

by Sarah Rakowski

A team of scientists searching for remnant populations of the Critically Endangered grey-breasted parakeet has found a small group nesting in a small crevice on the top of a rugged mountain ridge in north-east Brazil.

Only around 300 of these birds are thought to remain in the wild, all of which are found in the Brazilian state of Ceará.

As part of a national action plan for the species, researchers from local organisation Aquasis have searched more than 20 sites for signs of the parakeet, focusing their efforts on areas identified as having high habitat potential or historical sightings.

This new discovery brings the total number of known groups up to three. By comparison, historical data show that at least 15 separate populations once existed…

(read more: Fauna & Flora International)

photos by Fabio Nunes and Aquasis

superbnature:

Owl by photoenatura http://ift.tt/1mthEe8

thivus:

danbutt:

quality reporting

you can’t deny what they’re saying is true though

superbnature:

Untitled by liteon http://ift.tt/1mz110G

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 600D
  2. Aperture: f/5.6
  3. Exposure: 1/500th
  4. Focal Length: 456mm
  1. Camera: Canon EOS-1D X
  2. Aperture: f/8
  3. Exposure: 1/1250th
  4. Focal Length: 534mm

raptorbirds:

Gyps fulvus (by Glenn van Windt)

superbnature:

Happy moment by ozsa http://ift.tt/1m0NxKv

  1. Camera: Nikon D300s
  2. Aperture: f/5.6
  3. Exposure: 1/1000th
  4. Focal Length: 300mm

renatagrieco:

August 29, 2014 - Australian Brush-turkey (Alectura lathami)

Requested by: hipsterarpaca

Found in northeastern Australia, these birds eat insects, seeds, and fruits, foraging mostly on the ground. Males build large mounds to incubate the eggs, maintaining a constant temperature by adding or removing decaying vegetation. After hatching, the chicks dig their way out of the mound, emerging fully feathered and able to survive on their own.